Extreme weather kills 10 across country; more snow, flooding expected

It’s not even winter yet, but the deadly weather in parts of the United States suggests otherwise.

Following a weekend where at least 10 weather-related deaths were reported in Texas and Kansas, more than 3 million people find themselves in a winter storm warning for heavy snow.

And about 9 million — in an area extending from Oklahoma to Wisconsin and Minnesota — are under a winter weather advisory for snow and ice.

By Monday afternoon, snow was falling across Nebraska, Iowa, South Dakota and Minnesota. Anywhere between 6 and 10 inches of snow — and up to a foot — were expected, CNN meteorologist Taylor Ward said.

Over the weekend, black ice and treacherous road conditions led to the deaths of five people in Kansas.

And Texas is grappling with a different kind of extreme weather: mammoth flooding that has already killed five people.

Here’s what to expect in the regions facing severe weather this week:

The Plains

A developing storm is expected to dump heavy snow on parts of the Northern Plains early this week, the National Weather Service said.

Minnesota is expected to bear the brunt of the snowfall — as much as a foot, CNN weather producer Michael Guy said. South Dakota could get up to 8 inches of snow.

And Kansas, Iowa and Nebraska are under the gun for freezing rain.

The dangerous road conditions come after a deadly weekend in Kansas, where five people died in single-vehicle crashes, the state’s Highway Patrol said. All were caused by black ice or hazardous road conditions.

Texas

With this current weather system, Dallas has beaten its all-time yearly rainfall record — with a month left to go.

The city has received more than 57 inches — almost 5 feet — of rain this year. The previous record of 53.54 inches was set in 1991.

And there’s more to come.

Water levels are expected to continue to rise along the west fork of the Trinity River through Wednesday or Thursday.

Three people have already died from flooding in the Dallas area.

Benjamin Floyd, 29, was on his way to work when raging floodwaters swept his car off the road in Garland, according to CNN affiliate KTVT-TV. He was unable to get out of his vehicle before it was submerged Friday, Garland city officials said.

The two other flooding deaths came in Johnson County, south of Fort Worth, county officials said.

At least one other person went missing and is presumed dead in Tarrant County. And a sheriff’s deputy who tried to save a woman was nearly swept away as well.

A vehicle carrying the 70-year-old woman was washed away by high waters Friday morning, sheriff’s department spokesman Terry Grisham said.

During an attempt to rescue her, sheriff’s deputy Krystal Salazar got caught in the surging waters and had to hold onto a tree for two hours. The deputy was rescued.

Oklahoma

Gov. Mary Fallin declared a state of emergency for all 77 counties due to the wintry weather tormenting Oklahoma.

About 100,000 homes still didn’t have power Sunday as a result of freezing rain, ice and sleet that began Thursday.

The state of emergency allows state agencies to make emergency purchases, and helps provide vehicles used to move utility poles to affected areas, the governor’s office said.

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