Property Tax/Rent Rebate Program Income Guidelines Increased to Accommodate Social Security Cost-of-Living Increases

HARRISBURG – As a result of House Bill 1067, which Gov. Tom Corbett signed into law on Oct. 22, income eligibility guidelines for the Property Tax/Rent Rebate Program have changed so that income increases due solely to Social Security cost-of-living adjustments (COLAs) will no longer disqualify claimants from receiving rebates.

Any homeowner who receives Social Security, was paid a property tax rebate in 2013 for claim year 2012 and had annual income up to $35,298 last year is encouraged to apply for a rebate for claim year 2013. Also, renters who receive Social Security, were paid a rent rebate in 2013 for claim year 2012 and had annual incomes last year up to$15,128 are also encouraged to apply.

The deadline to apply for a rebate on property taxes or rent paid in 2013 is Dec. 31.

The Property Tax/Rent Rebate Program benefits eligible Pennsylvanians age 65 and older; widows and widowers age 50 and older; and people with disabilities age 18 and older. The income limit is $35,000 a year for homeowners and $15,000 annually for renters, and half of Social Security income – and now Social Security COLAs – are excluded.

The department is automatically reviewing previously denied claim year 2013 applications where the rebate was denied for income in excess of $35,000 for homeowners and $15,000 for renters. In cases where the overage is due solely to Social Security COLAs, the department will reopen, process and pay these claims.

Property Tax/Rent Rebate claim forms (PA-1000) and related information are available online at www.revenue.state.pa.us or by calling, toll-free, 1-888-222-9190.

About the Property Tax/Rent Rebate Program:
The maximum standard rebate is $650, but supplemental rebates for qualifying homeowners can boost rebates to $975. The Revenue Department automatically calculates supplemental rebates for qualifying homeowners.

The Property Tax/Rent Rebate Program is one of five programs supported by the Pennsylvania Lottery. Since the program’s 1971 inception, older and disabled adults have received more than $5.6 billion in property tax and rent relief. The expanded portion of the rebate program is paid for with revenue from slots gaming.

Groundhog Wine Trail Tickets Now Available
Historical Society Holds DuBois Lantern Walk

Leave a Reply